The Wacky and Wonderful Jackfruit

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So on Saturday, my husband went alone to do the produce shopping (I was sleeping in after two weeks of family visits).  I figured he’d buy the usual – cucumbers, okra, papaya, mangoes, eggs, greens etc. etc.  I did NOT, however, expect him to come home with this:

Jackfruit

And what is this, you may ask?  This, my friends, is a jackfruit.  One of nature’s largest edible fruits, if not THE largest (let me do some research and get back to you).  This particular jackfruit was about 15″ long from stem to tip, give or take an inch.  You may remember the photo of them growing on the tree in Aberra Bulbulla’s orchard – and I believe that Doug bought this one from him.

Jackfruit are prized in the Far East, and there are many recipes created to cook with them.  You can also just eat them straight, as we chose to do with this one as a first experiment.  Jackfruit also grows throughout the Caribbean and is considered a delicacy (and a full meal) by those who enjoy its delicate fruity flavor.  It can be cooked and prepared in recipes green, or wait until it’s ripe for out of hand eating and sweeter delicious flavor.

I will warn you though, that it is not a fruit for those with a queasy stomach.  A ripe jackfruit such as this one gives off an odor reminiscent of sweet sweaty feet.  It isn’t particularly terrible, but it isn’t particularly pleasant either.  This is due to the amount of latex in the skin, which is the next hurdle to get past.  The sap is very sticky, and doesn’t wash off of your skin with soap – rubbing your skin with oil is the way to remove it.

Gloves

To cut open our jackfruit, we grabbed an old pizza box (local pizza, of course) to serve as the cutting surface and to catch the sap and juice and so on.  My husband – whose hands are modeling for me in this demo – wore gloves to keep them from getting too sticky, and we got out a large serrated knife and a bottle of grapeseed oil to grease it with (again to stop the sticky sap).

Cutting the jackfruit

Cutting the jackfruit wasn’t hard.  A thin layer of oil on the knife, and it cut right through the skin easily into the soft fruit interior.  We cut it more of less straight down from stem to tip to make it easier to remove the fruit “pods” inside, and then my husband pulled the two halves apart.  But this is where it gets really insane.

photo 2

AAAAAAGGGGHHHHHH!!!!  *hyperventilates*

*catching breath*  Okay, okay, it’s not that bad.  The interior of the jackfruit may – ah – look like some sort of terrible alien dissection experiment gone wrong, but remember – IT’S A FRUIT.  Those aren’t really organs and spines and tentacles inside.  Trust me.  And the sweet scent is actually amazing!  This was the point when I started to think I might be okay actually eating some of this behemoth.

Fruit "pod"

This is what you’re going for.  Nestled all inside the strands of flesh are the fruit “pods.”  Each pod contains a seed which is also edible when it is boiled.

Seed

Splitting open the pod with a finger reveals the seed, which you pull out and set aside.  The fruit “pods” are then put in their own dish, and they are ready to eat!

pods

But of course the question is – Julie, what do they taste like?  They actually taste wonderful!  They are sweet and citrus-y and fruity all at the same time.  One of my friends says that they taste like Froot Loops, which I definitely can taste, and another friend has told me that jackfruit is the inspirational flavor for Juicy Fruit gum!  And that is really what they smell and taste like – outside of their latex skin, the scent is definitely reminiscent of Juicy Fruit.

We ate this jackfruit simply as you see it here, as fruits.  After a day in the refrigerator, they actually set up and had the consistency of peaches.  I could see using them in various recipes and smoothies that call for peaches, and they would be quite delicious!  There are also many recipes available on the internet that I have yet to try.

The seeds we boiled with salt for about 1/2 hour, and then peeled off their membranes and ate them.  They have a starchy consistency and taste, a bit like a fruity sweet potato or chestnut.  My husband enjoyed them more than me, but they weren’t bad.

Young jackfruit is also available canned, and is catching on in the states as a meat substitute for vegans in BBQ.  I may get brave enough to try it!  But for now, we’ve enjoyed this first foray into the wacky jackfruit.  If you get the chance to buy and try one, you should!  They are well worth the bit of creepy factor for the delicious fruit.  Happy hunting!

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3 thoughts on “The Wacky and Wonderful Jackfruit

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